We have had hundreds of people from the dental profession enquire about our air purifier product with respect to the current situation around COVID-19.

Colleagues are confused about what to do and how to formulate their response in being able to open safely such that they can treat patients and reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19. This risk is higher to the dental team than it is to the patient when treatment is being undertaken partly due to the close proximity of team members and the inherent absence of the possibility of social distancing.

Many enquirers have asked about the evidence regarding this technology and several have been confused and/or misled by posts on social media.

As a result, we have given below several different resources that may help colleagues consider an investment into Air Purification that has the capacity to kill viruses and bacteria. Specifically, we have tried to provide resources that consider plasma technology because as a supplier, we did our due diligence and found this to be our preference.

The reason that this is our preference is the simplicity of the technology and the virtual lack of ongoing running costs.

  • Hallier, C., Williams, D., Potts, A. and Lewis, M., 2010. A pilot study of bioaerosol reduction using an air cleaning system during dental procedures. British Dental Journal, 209(8), pp. E14-E14..
  • Business Insider. 2020. Coronavirus Is Rapidly Exposing the Vulnerability of Workers Who Perform Physical Services. Here Are The 47 Jobs That Most Put Your Overall Health at Risk. [online] Available at: https://www.businessinsider.com/most-unhealthy-jobs-in-america-2017-4?r=US&IR=T [Accessed 14 April 2020].
  • Laheij, A., Kistler, J., Belibasakis, G., Välimaa, H. and de Soet, J., 2012. Healthcare-associated viral and bacterial infections in dentistry. Journal of Oral Microbiology, 4(1), p.17659.
  • Dental Economics. 2017. Protecting Dental Staff from The Most Hazardous Job In America. [online] Available at: https://www.dentaleconomics.com/science-tech/article/16389519/protecting-dental-staff-from-the-most-hazardous-job-in-america [Accessed 14 April 2020].
  • Zemouri, C., de Soet, H., Crielaard, W. and Laheij, A., 2017. A scoping review on bio-aerosols in healthcare and the dental environment. PLOS ONE, 12(5), p.e0178007.
  • Al Maghlouth A, Al Yousef Y, Al-Bagieh NH., 2007. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of microbial aerosols in selected areas within the College of Dentistry, King Saud University. Quintessence International, 38(5): e222-8. Available at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17568825 [Accessed 14 April 2020]. .
  • Polednik, B., 2014. Aerosol and bioaerosol particles in a dental office. Environmental Research, 134, pp.405-409.
  • Szymańska J., 2007. Dental bioaerosol as an occupational hazard in a dentist’s workplace. Annals of Agricultural and Environmental Medicine. 14(2):203- 7.
  • Rautemaa R, Nordberg A, Wuolijoki-Saaristo K, Meurman JH., 2006. Bacterial aerosols in dental practice – a potential hospital infection problem? Journal of Hospital Infection, 64(1):76-81.
  • Laheij, A., Kistler, J., Belibasakis, G., Välimaa, H. and de Soet, J., 2012. Healthcare-associated viral and bacterial infections in dentistry. Journal of Oral Microbiology, 4(1), p.17659.
  • Peralta, G., Tobin-D’Angelo, M., Parham, A., Edison, L., Lorentzson, L., Smith, C. and Drenzek, C., 2016. Notes from the Field: Mycobacterium abscessusInfections Among Patients of a Pediatric Dentistry Practice — Georgia, 2015. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 65(13), pp.355-356.
  • Ricci, M., Fontana, S., Pinci, F., Fiumana, E., Pedna, M., Farolfi, P., Sabattini, M. and Scaturro, M., 2012. Pneumonia associated with a dental unit waterline. The Lancet, 379(9816), p.684.
  • NPR. 2016. Infection Outbreak Shines Light on Water Risks at Dentists Offices. [online] Available at: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/09/30/495802487/infection-outbreak-shines-light-on-water-risks-at-dentists-offices?t=1586427355121 [Accessed 14 April 2020].
  • Valand, K. and McLoughlin, P., 2009. MRSA infection. British Dental Journal, 207(7), pp.304-304.
  • Martin, M. and Hardy, P., 1991. Two cases of oral infection by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. British Dental Journal, 170(2), pp.63-64.
  • Roberts, M., Soge, O., Horst, J., Ly, K. and Milgrom, P., 2011. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from dental school clinic surfaces and students. American Journal of Infection Control, 39(8), pp.628-632.
  • Kurita, H., Kurashina, K. and Honda, T., 2006. Nosocomial transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus via the surfaces of the dental operatory. British Dental Journal, 201(5), pp.297-300.
  • Liu, M., Tung, T., Chung, F., Chuang, L. and Wan, G., 2017. High total volatile organic compounds pollution in a hospital dental department. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 189(11).
  • Helmis, C., Tzoutzas, J., Flocas, H., Halios, C., Stathopoulou, O., Assimakopoulos, V., Panis, V., Apostolatou, M., Sgouros, G. and Adam, E., 2007. Indoor air quality in a dentistry clinic. Science of The Total Environment, 377(2-3), pp.349-365.
  • Laheij, A., Kistler, J., Belibasakis, G., Välimaa, H. and de Soet, J., 2012. Healthcare-associated viral and bacterial infections in dentistry. Journal of Oral Microbiology, 4(1), p.17659.
  • Oral Health. 2016. Why Face Masks Don’t Work: A Revealing Review. [online] Available at: https://www.oralhealthgroup.com/features/face-masks-dont-work-revealing-review/ [Accessed 14 April 2020].
  • Costa, D., Mercier, A., Gravouil, K., Lesobre, J., Verdon, J. and Imbert, C., 2016. Occurrence and diversity of both bacterial and fungal communities in dental unit waterlines subjected to disinfectants. Pathogens and Disease, 74(7) p.ftw094
  • Helmis, C., Tzoutzas, J., Flocas, H., Halios, C., Stathopoulou, O., Assimakopoulos, V., Panis, V., Apostolatou, M., Sgouros, G. and Adam, E., 2007. Indoor air quality in a dentistry clinic. Science of The Total Environment, 377(2-3), pp.349-365.
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